Book Report: Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg

tumblr_inline_nmijx1iYow1s3uo67_500Due to the recent events of Justice Antonin Scalia’s death, I decided to finally finish this incredibly enthralling ode to a person who inspires so many people: Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

In this sassy book, full of pictures, visual aids, and timelines, we explore her childhood, education, and career and the challenges she faced along the way. Inspired from the popular Tumblr account, two authors – Irin Carmon & Shana Knizhnik – create a book that engaged an audience not normally aware of the lives and positions of SCOTUS members.

I especially enjoyed reading her dissents including in the Voting Rights Act case, with the authors’ annotative analysis emphasize the points supporting her minority view.

To end, I have included two images I took from this book of RBG and Scalia together. RIP to RBG’s “best buddy.”

photo 1  photo 2

State Supreme Court: Charter schools are unconstitutional

Employees of Washington Commercial Painters enter the Summit Sierra charter school as they retouch the interior during after hours, Friday, September 4, 2015. After nearly a year of deliberation, the state Supreme Court ruled late Friday afternoon that charter schools are not constitutional.

Friday, the Washington State Supreme Court overturned a law voted in 2012 that allowed for the public-funded support of charter schools for reasons of unconstitutionality.

“Justice Mary E. Fairhurst agreed with the majority that charter schools aren’t common schools, but argued in a partial dissenting opinion that the state “can constitutionally support charter schools through the general fund.” -The Seattle Times

Shouldn’t we explore any and all areas for opportunity for growth and improvement in the public education system? Shouldn’t we welcome new challenges? When there is a waitlist for charter schools, don’t we owe it to the children to ensure everyone has that opportunity? I mean isn’t that what this is all about anyway: the kids?

I still wholeheartedly do not like the fact that this means funds are diverted from public schools who also need them, and it sets a dangerous precedence for what public schools could become (i.e. the “bad” option), but the answer is not by remaining stagnant, we need radical reform and we need it now.