State of the City: Mayor Ed Murray

CityofSeattleMayor Murray Delivered the State of the City address to Satellites today with optimism and caution. The Seattle Times article, shares Murray’s comments that while the tech and economic growth of Seattle, “‘reflects the 21st-century dreams of the 1962 World’s Fair: a vibrant city driven by technology and science creating jobs and innovation in everything from transportation to health care,’” it at the same time is weary of a growing population of homelessness which according to the One Night Count found an increase of 19% from last year which is very startling for what the future of Seattle could look like. Murray warns of the, “[fear] from the Great Depression as issues of homelessness and inequity continue despite decades of effort on the part of this city to resolve them.”

 

Children the victims of a stalling Legislature; fix education-funding crisis now

4717403c-c622-11e5-91a1-8b45811710be-1020x655The Seattle Times Editorial Board posted an article about how “Washington’s state Senate is pursuing wise accountability measures as it works on the state’s education-funding crisis. But it cannot allow the fix to be delayed further, shortchanging another entering class of students.”

People ask what we can do about this: write letters to your legislature or even more simply, vote. Vote for individuals who will make education a priority.

State Supreme Court: Charter schools are unconstitutional

Employees of Washington Commercial Painters enter the Summit Sierra charter school as they retouch the interior during after hours, Friday, September 4, 2015. After nearly a year of deliberation, the state Supreme Court ruled late Friday afternoon that charter schools are not constitutional.

Friday, the Washington State Supreme Court overturned a law voted in 2012 that allowed for the public-funded support of charter schools for reasons of unconstitutionality.

“Justice Mary E. Fairhurst agreed with the majority that charter schools aren’t common schools, but argued in a partial dissenting opinion that the state “can constitutionally support charter schools through the general fund.” -The Seattle Times

Shouldn’t we explore any and all areas for opportunity for growth and improvement in the public education system? Shouldn’t we welcome new challenges? When there is a waitlist for charter schools, don’t we owe it to the children to ensure everyone has that opportunity? I mean isn’t that what this is all about anyway: the kids?

I still wholeheartedly do not like the fact that this means funds are diverted from public schools who also need them, and it sets a dangerous precedence for what public schools could become (i.e. the “bad” option), but the answer is not by remaining stagnant, we need radical reform and we need it now.